angular mat table with dynamic columns generate and data should be populated in horizontal way with code examples

An Angular Material Table is a powerful feature of the Angular framework that offers a wide range of options for data display, filtering, and sorting. With Angular Material, you can easily create dynamic tables that can show and hide columns, resize columns, and reorder columns. Moreover, Angular Material tables allow you to define the layout and styling of your data in a way that is consistent with your application's design. In this article, we will learn how to generate dynamic columns and populate data horizontally in an Angular Material Table.

Angular Material Table with Dynamic Columns

Creating an Angular Material Table is relatively straightforward. However, when it comes to generating dynamic columns, the process can be a bit more complicated. Dynamic columns are columns whose names and data can change based on certain user actions or business rules. In an Angular Material Table, dynamic columns can be created by defining an array of column objects and using the NgFor directive to loop through them. The following code example shows how to create an array of column objects:

export class MyComponent {
  columns = [
    {name: 'Name', property: 'name'},
    {name: 'Age', property: 'age'},
    {name: 'Address', property: 'address'}
  ];
}

In this example, we created an array of column objects that have two properties: name and property. The name property represents the display name of the column, while the property property represents the corresponding data property that should be displayed in the column.

Next, we need to use the NgFor directive to loop through the array of column objects and create a corresponding

element for each column. The following code example shows how to do this:

<table mat-table [dataSource]="data">
  <ng-container *ngFor="let column of columns">
    <th mat-header-cell *matHeaderCellDef>{{column.name}}</th>
    <td mat-cell *matCellDef="let row">{{row[column.property]}}</td>
  </ng-container>
</table>

In this example, we used the NgFor directive to loop through the array of column objects and create a

element for each column. We also used the matHeaderCellDef directive to define the header cell template for the column and the matCellDef directive to define the data cell template for the column.

Populating Data in a Horizontal Way

Now that we have created a dynamic Angular Material Table, the next step is to populate the data horizontally. In other words, we want to ensure that the data in each row is displayed in the correct column and that the columns are aligned properly. We can achieve this by modifying the data source of the table and using a different NgFor directive to loop through each row of the data.

The following code example shows how to populate a horizontal Angular Material Table with dynamic columns:

export class MyComponent {
  columns = [
    {name: 'Name', property: 'name'},
    {name: 'Age', property: 'age'},
    {name: 'Address', property: 'address'}
  ];

  data = [
    {name: 'John', age: 30, address: '123 Main St.'},
    {name: 'Jane', age: 25, address: '456 Maple Ave.'}
  ];
}

In this example, we defined a static data source that contains two rows of data. Each row contains three properties: name, age, and address. These properties correspond to the columns defined in the array of column objects.

We can now use the following code example to populate the horizontal Angular Material Table:

<table mat-table [dataSource]="data">
  <ng-container *ngFor="let column of columns">
    <th mat-header-cell *matHeaderCellDef>{{column.name}}</th>
    <td mat-cell *matCellDef="let row">{{row[column.property]}}</td>
  </ng-container>
  <tr mat-header-row *matHeaderRowDef="columns.map(column => column.name)"></tr>
  <tr mat-row *matRowDef="let row; columns: columns.map(column => column.property)"></tr>
</table>

In this example, we used the same NgFor loop that we used to create the dynamic columns. However, instead of specifying the data source as the input property of the table, we used the dataSource property to define a new DataSource object that is generated from the data source. We also used two new NgFor directives to define the header and data rows of the table.

The matHeaderRowDef directive defines the header row of the table and maps each column name to the corresponding

element. The matRowDef directive defines the data rows of the table and maps each column property to the corresponding

element. The result is a horizontally displayed Angular Material Table with dynamic columns and populated data.

Conclusion

Angular Material Tables offer a powerful way to display data in an organized, consistent, and responsive manner. With dynamic columns and horizontal data population, you can create tables that are flexible and adaptable to your application's needs. Dynamic columns can be created by defining an array of column objects and using the NgFor directive to loop through them. Horizontal data population can be achieved by modifying the data source of the table and using a different NgFor directive to loop through each row of the data. By combining these two techniques, you can create dynamic and horizontally populated Angular Material Tables that are tailor-made for your application.

let's dive deeper into the previous topics.

Angular Material Table with Dynamic Columns

In the previous section, we learned how to create an Angular Material Table with dynamic columns. Dynamic columns are especially useful when you need to show different sets of columns based on certain user actions or business rules. For example, you might have a table that displays different information for different types of users, or a table that shows or hides certain columns based on user preferences.

To create dynamic columns in an Angular Material Table, you need to define an array of column objects that represent the columns in the table. Each column object should have two properties: name and property. The name property represents the display name of the column, while the property property represents the corresponding data property that should be displayed in the column.

Once you have defined the array of column objects, you can use the NgFor directive to loop through the array and create a corresponding

element for each column. You can also use the matCellDef directive to define the

elements in the table body. By using these directives, you can dynamically generate the columns and display the data in the table.

Populating Data in a Horizontal Way

In the previous section, we also learned how to populate data horizontally in an Angular Material Table. Horizontal data population is especially useful when you have a large number of columns and want to make sure that the data is displayed in the correct column.

To populate data horizontally in an Angular Material Table, you need to use a different NgFor directive to loop through each row of the data. You also need to define the header row using the matHeaderRowDef directive, which maps each column name to the corresponding

element. Finally, you need to define the data rows using the matRowDef directive, which maps each data property to the corresponding

element.

By using these directives, you can ensure that the data is displayed horizontally in the correct columns, even if you have a large number of columns. This technique is especially useful when you need to display complex data sets that require a lot of columns.

Conclusion

Angular Material Tables offer a powerful way to display data in an organized and consistent manner. By using dynamic columns and horizontal data population, you can create tables that are flexible and adaptable to your application's needs. Whether you are displaying data for different types of users or showing or hiding columns based on user preferences, Angular Material Tables provide a powerful and flexible way to display the data in your application.

Popular questions

  1. What are dynamic columns in an Angular Material Table?
    Dynamic columns are columns in an Angular Material Table where the columns, names, and data can change based on certain user actions or business rules. It is achieved by defining an array of column objects that can dynamically generate columns and display the data in the table.

  2. How do you create dynamic columns in an Angular Material Table?
    To create dynamic columns in an Angular Material Table, you need to define an array of column objects that contain two properties: name and property. The name property represents the display name of the column, while the property property represents the corresponding data property that should be displayed in the column. You can use the NgFor directive to loop through the array and create

    elements for each column easily.

  3. How do you populate data horizontally in an Angular Material Table?
    To populate data horizontally in an Angular Material Table, you need to use a different NgFor directive to loop through each row of the data. You also need to define the header row using the matHeaderRowDef directive, which maps each column name to the corresponding

    element. Finally, you need to define the data rows using the matRowDef directive, which maps each data property to the corresponding

    element.

  4. How can dynamic columns and horizontal data population be helpful in an application?
    Dynamic columns and horizontal data population can be very helpful when you are displaying complex data sets that require a lot of columns and the columns, names and data can change based on certain user actions or business rules. By making use of these features of Angular Material Tables, you can create tables that are more flexible, adaptable and better suited to your application's needs.

  5. Can you give an example of a situation where dynamic columns and horizontal data population are useful?
    An example of when dynamic columns and horizontal data population would be useful is an e-commerce website where the columns displayed could change based on whether a user is a guest or registered user. For example, if a user is a guest, then some columns such as the quantity and product ID may not be displayed, whereas if they are a registered user, then these columns would be displayed to aid tracking of their orders. By utilizing dynamic columns and horizontal data population, the table can be easily adjusted to display only relevant columns to each user type accurately.

Tag

"AngularMatTableHorizontalDynamic"

Have an amazing zeal to explore, try and learn everything that comes in way. Plan to do something big one day! TECHNICAL skills Languages - Core Java, spring, spring boot, jsf, javascript, jquery Platforms - Windows XP/7/8 , Netbeams , Xilinx's simulator Other - Basic’s of PCB wizard
Posts created 3116

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

Begin typing your search term above and press enter to search. Press ESC to cancel.

Back To Top