check powershell version with code examples

PowerShell is a command-line shell and scripting language used to automate system administration tasks in Windows. It is a powerful tool that can be used to manage and control various system resources using simple command-line instructions. Like any other software, PowerShell has different versions that come with various improvements and features. In this article, we will discuss different ways to check PowerShell version with code examples.

Method 1: Using the PowerShell Command

The easiest way to check the version of PowerShell installed on your system is to use the command prompt. You can use the below command in the PowerShell command prompt to check the version number:

$PSVersionTable

When you run this command, it displays a table that shows the PowerShell version installed on your system, as shown below:

Name                           Value
----                           -----
PSVersion                     7.1.2
PSEdition                     Core
GitCommitId                   7.1.2
OS                            Microsoft Windows 10.0.19042
Platform                      Win32NT

In this example, the PowerShell version is 7.1.2.

Method 2: Using the $PSVersionTable Automatic Variable

PowerShell provides an automatic variable called $PSVersionTable, which can be used to check the PowerShell version. The $PSVersionTable variable contains all the information about the PowerShell version installed on your system.

You can use the following command to display the PowerShell version number:

$PSVersionTable.PSVersion

When you run this command, it displays only the PowerShell version number, as shown below:

Major  Minor  Patch  PreReleaseLabel BuildLabel
-----  -----  -----  --------------- ----------
7      1      2

In this example, the PowerShell version is 7.1.2.

Method 3: Checking the Registry Key

You can also check the PowerShell version by checking the registry key. Follow the below steps to do that:

  1. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run dialog box.

  2. Type regedit and press Enter.

  3. In the Registry Editor, go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine.

  4. Look for the PowerShellVersion string value.

  5. Double-click on it to open the Edit String dialog box.

  6. On this dialog box, you can check the version number.

In this example, the PowerShell version is 7.1.2.

Method 4: Using the $PSHost Object

PowerShell also provides access to a $PSHost object, which can be used to check the PowerShell version. The $PSHost object contains all the details about the PowerShell host, including the version number.

You can use the following command to display the PowerShell version number:

$PSHost.Version

When you run this command, it displays only the PowerShell version number, as shown below:

Major  Minor  Build  Revision
-----  -----  -----  --------
7      1      2      -1

In this example, the PowerShell version is 7.1.2.

Method 5: Using the $Host Automatic Variable

PowerShell provides another automatic variable called $Host, which can be used to check the PowerShell version. The $Host variable contains all the information about the PowerShell host, including the version number.

You can use the following command to display the PowerShell version number:

$Host.Version

When you run this command, it displays only the PowerShell version number, as shown below:

Major  Minor  Build  Revision
-----  -----  -----  --------
7      1      2      -1

In this example, the PowerShell version is 7.1.2.

Conclusion

In this article, we discussed different ways to check the PowerShell version using code examples. You can use any of these methods to check the version number of PowerShell installed on your system. Knowing the version of PowerShell is important because different versions of PowerShell come with different features and improvements, and some scripts and command-line instructions may not work correctly or efficiently with different versions of PowerShell.

here's some additional information about the previous topics discussed:

Method 1: Using the PowerShell Command

The PowerShell command prompt is the easiest way to check the version of PowerShell installed on your system. It works for both Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core versions. $PSVersionTable is a built-in automatic variable that contains information about the PowerShell version and environment on which it's running, including the version number, edition, build, and operating system.

Method 2: Using the $PSVersionTable Automatic Variable

$PSVersionTable is an automatic variable that contains all the information about the PowerShell version installed on your system. This method provides just the version number without any additional details. It's useful when you only need to know the version number quickly.

Method 3: Checking the Registry Key

Checking the registry key is a manual way to check the PowerShell version installed on your system. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine is the registry key that holds information about the PowerShell version installed on the system. This method is helpful when the PowerShell environment isn't functioning correctly, and the previous methods aren't producing accurate results.

Method 4: Using the $PSHost Object

The $PSHost object is a built-in variable in PowerShell that contains information about the environment in which the cmdlet is being run. It has information about the version of PowerShell and the host that's running it. The $PSHost object is used when you want more details about the PowerShell environment, like the build and revision numbers.

Method 5: Using the $Host Automatic Variable

The $Host automatic variable is similar to the $PSHost object, but it's simpler and only contains basic information about the PowerShell version. Like the $PSHost object, this method provides information about the PowerShell host and version number.

In conclusion, checking the version of PowerShell is essential for compatibility and troubleshooting issues that occur while executing commands or scripts. These different methods allow you to choose the one that best suits your needs and access the information that you require. Whether you are an administrator, developer, or advanced user, knowing the PowerShell version will make your work more efficient and productive.

Popular questions

Sure, here are five questions about checking PowerShell version with code examples, along with their answers:

  1. What is the $PSVersionTable Automatic Variable, and how can you use it to check PowerShell versions?

The $PSVersionTable automatic variable is a built-in variable in PowerShell that contains various information about the PowerShell version and environment. It provides details like the edition, build label, and operating system. You can use the variable to check the PowerShell version by running the following command:

$PSVersionTable.PSVersion

This command will display only the PowerShell version number.

  1. How can you check the PowerShell version installed on your system using the registry key?

You can check the PowerShell version using the registry key by following these simple steps:

  1. Press the Windows key and R key together to open the Run dialog box.

  2. Type "regedit" and press enter to open the Registry Editor.

  3. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine.

  4. Look for the string value named PowerShellVersion. Double-click on it to see the version number.

  5. Why is it important to know the PowerShell Version installed on your system?

It's essential to know the PowerShell version installed on your system because different versions have different features and improvements. Some scripts and command-line instructions may not work with different versions of PowerShell. Therefore, knowing the PowerShell version is important for compatibility and executing efficient commands and scripts.

  1. What is the difference between the $PSHost Object and the $Host Automatic Variable?

The $PSHost object and the $Host automatic variable are similar, but the $PSHost object is more detailed. The $PSHost object provides information about the PowerShell environment, like the version number, build number, and revision number. The $Host automatic variable provides basic information about the PowerShell version and environment. You can use either of these methods to check the PowerShell version.

  1. Can you use any of the code examples to check the PowerShell version on PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell?

Yes, all of the code examples provided in the article can be used to check the PowerShell version on both Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core.

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I am a driven and diligent DevOps Engineer with demonstrated proficiency in automation and deployment tools, including Jenkins, Docker, Kubernetes, and Ansible. With over 2 years of experience in DevOps and Platform engineering, I specialize in Cloud computing and building infrastructures for Big-Data/Data-Analytics solutions and Cloud Migrations. I am eager to utilize my technical expertise and interpersonal skills in a demanding role and work environment. Additionally, I firmly believe that knowledge is an endless pursuit.

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