css dot dot dot with code examples

CSS is a powerful tool that allows designers to control the styling and layout of web pages. One of the lesser-known features of CSS is the "dot dot dot" property. This property, formally known as ellipsis, allows designers to truncate text that overflows beyond the boundaries of a container. In this article, we'll explore how to use the CSS dot dot dot property and provide some code examples to help you get started.

What is CSS Dot Dot Dot?

Before we dive into the details of CSS dot dot dot, let's clarify what we mean by "ellipsis." An ellipsis is a series of dots (typically three) that indicate missing text. In CSS, we can use the ellipsis to indicate that text within an element has been truncated and continues beyond the boundaries of that element.

The CSS dot dot dot property (officially called text-overflow) is used to add an ellipsis to text that overflows the boundaries of its container. When this property is applied to an element, the text that extends beyond the container's width is replaced with an ellipsis.

Using CSS Dot Dot Dot

The text-overflow property has two values: clip and ellipsis. The clip value simply truncates the text and does not add an ellipsis. The ellipsis value, on the other hand, adds an ellipsis to the end of the truncated text.

To use the text-overflow property, you must also set the overflow property to hidden. This tells the browser to cut off any text that extends beyond the container's boundaries.

Here's an example of how to use the CSS dot dot dot property:

div {
  width: 200px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

In this example, the width of the div element is set to 200 pixels. The white-space property is set to nowrap to prevent the text from wrapping to the next line. The overflow property is set to hidden to cut off any text that extends beyond the container's boundaries. Finally, the text-overflow property is set to ellipsis to add an ellipsis to the end of the truncated text.

Code Examples

Let's take a look at some code examples to see how the CSS dot dot dot property can be used in different scenarios.

Example 1: Truncating Text in a Table Cell

Tables can be a bit tricky to work with when it comes to text formatting. If you have a table cell with a lot of text that extends beyond the cell's boundaries, you can use the CSS dot dot dot property to truncate the text and add an ellipsis at the end.

table {
  width: 100%;
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

td {
  width: 100px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

In this example, we set the width of the table to 100% and collapse the borders. We then set the width of the table cells to 100 pixels and use the same CSS dot dot dot properties as before to truncate the text and add an ellipsis.

Example 2: Truncating Text in a List Item

Sometimes you may have a list of items where each item contains a title that might be longer than the space allowed. In this case, you can use the CSS dot dot dot property to truncate the title and add an ellipsis.

ul {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  list-style: none;
}

li {
  width: 200px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

In this example, we use a list element with no padding or margin and no bullet points. We then set the width of the list item to 200 pixels and use the same CSS dot dot dot properties to truncate the text and add an ellipsis.

Example 3: Truncating Text in a Button

Buttons are another common element that can have text that extends beyond the button's boundaries. If you have a button with a long label, you can use the CSS dot dot dot property to truncate the label and add an ellipsis.

button {
  width: 100px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

In this example, we set the width of the button to 100 pixels and use the same CSS dot dot dot properties to truncate the text and add an ellipsis.

Conclusion

The CSS dot dot dot property is a handy tool for truncating text in web page elements. By using the ellipsis value of the text-overflow property, you can add an indicator that the truncated text continues beyond the container's boundaries. With a few lines of code, you can make sure your web page is formatted correctly, and your text content is easy to read.

CSS is a versatile tool that offers designers the flexibility of creating various styling and layout options for web pages. In this article, we will recap some of the features we have covered and explore them in greater depth.

Let's start with the CSS "float" property. This property is commonly used for creating page layouts, such as when you want to have multiple elements next to each other on the page. When you "float" an element, you create a container around it and position it towards the left or right. This allows another element to flow beside it. Here's an example:

img {
  float: left;
  margin-right: 20px;
}

In this example, the image is floated to the left of its container, and the margin-right value helps to add some space between the image and the next element to the right.

Another CSS feature that we have explored is the "box-sizing" property. This property affects how the browser calculates the total width and height of an element, including properties like padding and borders. The default box-sizing value is "content-box." In this mode, the width and height properties only consider the element's content and exclude any padding or borders. However, you can change this to "border-box," which includes padding and borders in the calculation.

div {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 200px;
  border: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 20px;
}

In this example, we set the box-sizing value to "border-box," which includes the padding and borders in the element's total width calculation. This property is particularly useful when dealing with layouts, where you need to ensure that the page elements fit correctly within their containers.

Next is the "transform" property, which allows designers to modify an element's shape or size. The "transform" property works by changing the element's perspective, rotating it in different directions, or changing its scale. Here's an example:

div {
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}

In this example, we rotate an element 45 degrees using the "transform" property. This property is useful in creating unique geometries and shapes on web pages.

Lastly, we have the CSS "text-overflow" property, which we explored in the first part of this article. When text overflows an element's bounds, this property applies an ellipsis to the end of the text, indicating that more content exists. When combined with other CSS properties, such as "overflow," "white-space," and "width," text-overflow ensures that long text strings get cut off at the appropriate point.

div {
  width: 150px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

In this example, we set the element's width to 150 pixels and apply the "whitespace" and "overflow" properties to hide any content that falls outside of the element's container. We then apply the "text-overflow" property to add an ellipsis to the end of the truncated text.

CSS offers designers a wide range of tools to create appealing and innovative web pages. By mastering these features, you can improve your page layouts, add unique effects and styles, and create memorable user experiences.

Popular questions

Q1. What is the CSS dot dot dot property?
A1. The CSS dot dot dot property is formally known as ellipsis, which allows designers to truncate text that overflows beyond the boundaries of a container.

Q2. How do you use the text-overflow property in CSS?
A2. To use the text-overflow property, you must also set the overflow property to hidden. This tells the browser to cut off any text that extends beyond the container's boundaries.

Q3. How is the text-overflow property useful for web designers?
A3. The text-overflow property is useful for web designers as it allows you to truncate long text strings and add an ellipsis to the end, indicating that more content exists.

Q4. Can you provide an example of using CSS dot dot dot to truncate text in a table cell?
A4. Yes, here's an example:

table {
  width: 100%;
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

td {
  width: 100px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-overflow: ellipsis;
}

Q5. What other CSS properties can be combined with text-overflow to control text layout and overflow?
A5. Other CSS properties that can be combined with text-overflow to control text layout and overflow include white-space, width, and overflow. By setting these properties, you can ensure that the text is appropriately truncated and displayed within its container.

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