excel logical not equal with code examples

Introduction

In Microsoft Excel, logical not equal is one of the most commonly used operators that helps to compare two values and returns TRUE if they are not equal, otherwise False. It is represented by the symbol "<>". The logical not equal operator is used in various scenarios, including data analysis, financial reporting, and other calculations.

In this article, we will discuss the logical not equal operator in Excel with code examples. The code examples will highlight the usage and functionality of the operator in different scenarios.

Syntax

The logical not equal operator syntax in Excel is:

= value1 <> value 2

The operator can be applied to different types of data, such as numbers, text, logical, or cell reference. For instance:

= A1 <> B1

= 5 <> 11

= “John” <> “John”

Example 1: Logical not equal operator to compare two numbers

Suppose we have two sets of numbers in columns A and B, and we want to know which elements are not equal between them. We can use the logical not equal operator as shown below:

= A2 <> B2

This formula takes the value in cell A2 and compares it to the value in cell B2. If they are not equal, the formula returns TRUE; otherwise, it returns FALSE.

Example 2: Logical not equal operator to compare two text values

We can also use the logical not equal operator to compare two text values. The formula is similar, except that we use the text values enclosed in quotes, as shown below:

= A2 <> “Not equal”

This formula compares the value in cell A2 with the text “Not equal”. If they are not equal, it returns TRUE, and if they are equal, it returns FALSE.

Example 3: Logical not equal operator with IF function

The logical not equal operator can also be used in combination with the IF function to return a desired output based on the comparison result. For instance, we can use the IF function to return “Yes” if the comparison is not equal and “No” otherwise. The syntax is as shown below:

=IF(A2<>B2,”Yes”,”No”)

This formula compares the value in cell A2 with the value in cell B2. If they are not equal, the formula returns “Yes”, and if they are equal, it returns “No”.

Example 4: Logical not equal operator with COUNTIF function

The logical not equal operator can also be used with the COUNTIF function to count the number of cells that do not match a particular criterion. The syntax is as shown below:

= COUNTIF(range,”<> value”)

In this formula, we specify the range of cells we want to count, and the “<> value” criterion ensures that only cells that do not match the given value are counted. For instance, if we want to count the number of cells in a column that do not contain the value “Yes”, we can use the formula as shown below:

= COUNTIF(A2:A10,”<> Yes”)

Conclusion

The logical not equal operator is a powerful tool in Excel that helps compare values and return TRUE if they are not equal and FALSE if they are. Its application is versatile and cuts across different scenarios such as data analysis, financial reporting, and calculations. By applying the logical not equal operator with other Excel functions, we can derive meaningful insights from our data and make informed decisions.

Example 1: Logical not equal operator to compare two numbers

Let’s take a detailed look at the first example mentioned above, which involves comparing two sets of numbers in Excel using the logical not equal operator.

Suppose we have the following values in columns A and B:

A B


1 2
3 3
5 4
7 6

Now, we want to compare both columns and identify the number pairs that are not equal. To do this, we can use the logical not equal operator in a third column and write (in cell C1):

=A1<>B1

Copy this formula down to cells C2 to C5, and we'll get the following output:

C

TRUE
FALSE
TRUE
TRUE

Here, the formula in cell C1 compares the values of cells A1 and B1, resulting in a TRUE as both values are not equal. Similarly, the formula in C2 compares the values in A2 and B2, resulting in a FALSE as both are equal (i.e., 3). Likewise, C3 to C5 provide the comparison results for the entire column.

In this scenario, logical not equal operator helped us identify the cells that don’t match in both columns.

Example 2: Logical not equal operator to compare two text values

Now, let’s look at the second example mentioned above, which involves comparing two text values using the logical not equal operator.

Suppose we have the following text values in cells A1 and B1:

A B


Orange Apple

Now, we want to test whether the text values in A1 and B1 are not equal. To do this, we can use the logical not equal operator as = A1 <> B1 in cell C1.

This formula will return TRUE, as the values in A1 and B1 are not equal. If we were to replace the value in cell B1 with “Orange”, the formula would return FALSE, as the values in A1 and B1 are equal.

Example 3: Logical not equal operator with IF function

Coming to the third example mentioned above, we can use the logical not equal operator along with the IF function to return a desired output based on the comparison result.

Suppose we have the following values in columns A and B:

A B


12 18
19 19
5 7
20 6

If we want to check the values in columns A and B and return “Yes” if they are not equal and “No” if they are equal, we can use the IF function with the logical not equal operator.

In cell C1, we can use the following formula:

= IF(A1<>B1,"Yes","No")

This formula will compare the values in cells A1 and B1. If they are not equal, the formula will return “Yes”. If they are equal, the formula will return “No”. We can then copy this formula down to cells C2 to C5, and it will return the comparison results for the remaining cells in the column.

Example 4: Logical not equal operator with COUNTIF function

Moving to the final example, we can use the logical not equal operator with the COUNTIF function to quickly count the number of cells that do not match a particular criterion.

Suppose we have the following values in column A:

A

Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes

If we want to count the number of cells that do not contain the value “Yes”, we can use the COUNTIF function with the criterion “<> Yes”.

In cell B1, we can use the following formula:

= COUNTIF(A1:A5,"<> Yes")

This formula will count the number of cells in column A that do not contain the value “Yes”. The output will be 2, as cells A2 and A3 do not match the criterion.

Popular questions

  1. What is the logical not equal operator in Excel, and how is it represented?

The logical not equal operator is a comparison operator in Excel that is used to compare two values and returns TRUE if they are not equal. Its symbol is "<>".

  1. How can we use the logical not equal operator to compare two sets of numbers in Excel?

To compare two sets of numbers in Excel, we can use the logical not equal operator by writing the following formula in a third column: =A1<>B1, where A1 and B1 represent the numeric values we want to compare.

  1. Can we compare two text values in Excel using the logical not equal operator?

Yes, we can compare two text values using the logical not equal operator in Excel. The formula will remain the same as when we compare numeric values, except that we enclose the text values in quotes.

  1. How can we use the IF function with the logical not equal operator in Excel?

We can use the IF function with the logical not equal operator in Excel to return a desired output based on the comparison result. For instance, we can use the formula =IF(A1<>B1,"Yes","No") to return “Yes” if the values in cells A1 and B1 are not equal and “No” otherwise.

  1. How can we use the COUNTIF function with the logical not equal operator in Excel?

We can use the COUNTIF function with the logical not equal operator in Excel to count the number of cells that do not match a particular criterion. For instance, we can use the formula =COUNTIF(A1:A5,"<>Yes") to count the number of cells in column A that do not contain the value “Yes”.

Tag

"Excel-inequality"

As a seasoned software engineer, I bring over 7 years of experience in designing, developing, and supporting Payment Technology, Enterprise Cloud applications, and Web technologies. My versatile skill set allows me to adapt quickly to new technologies and environments, ensuring that I meet client requirements with efficiency and precision. I am passionate about leveraging technology to create a positive impact on the world around us. I believe in exploring and implementing innovative solutions that can enhance user experiences and simplify complex systems. In my previous roles, I have gained expertise in various areas of software development, including application design, coding, testing, and deployment. I am skilled in various programming languages such as Java, Python, and JavaScript and have experience working with various databases such as MySQL, MongoDB, and Oracle.
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