insert all or first in oracle sql with code examples

Inserting data into an Oracle SQL database table is an important function for database management. It is the process of adding one or more rows of data into an existing table. Oracle SQL provides syntax for two primary types of insertions: “INSERT ALL” and “INSERT FIRST” statements. These statements are unique and serve different purposes.

INSERT ALL statement provides a multi-insert feature which allows inserting multiple rows into a table. In contrast, the INSERT FIRST statement provides a feature to insert a single row based on a condition. This article covers both the “INSERT ALL” and “INSERT FIRST” statements for Oracle SQL, with code examples.

INSERT ALL:

The INSERT ALL syntax is used to insert multiple rows into a table at once. This feature is useful when working with tables that have many rows of data that need to be inserted into a table simultaneously. The syntax for the INSERT ALL statement is as follows:

INSERT ALL 
  INTO table_name (column1, column2, …, columnN) 
    VALUES (value1, value2, …, valueN) 
  INTO table_name (column1, column2, …, columnN) 
    VALUES (value1, value2, …, valueN) 
  …
SELECT * FROM dual;

In the syntax above, the INSERT ALL statement begins with the keyword INSERT ALL. The INTO clause is used to specify the name of the table and the columns that will be inserted. The VALUES clause specifies the corresponding data values for each column. Multiple INTO clauses can be used to insert multiple rows.

The SELECT statement at the end of the INSERT ALL statement is the common source for all the values being inserted in a row. To use a different source for each row, we would type the UNION keyword instead of using SELECT.

Let’s take an example to demonstrate this. Suppose we have a table named “students” with the following columns: “name,” “age,” “gender,” and “college_name.”

CREATE TABLE students (
        name VARCHAR2(50),
        age NUMBER(3),
        gender VARCHAR2(10),
        college_name VARCHAR2(100)
);

We can insert multiple rows using an INSERT ALL statement as shown below:

INSERT ALL 
  INTO students (name, age, gender, college_name) 
    VALUES ('John Doe', 23, 'Male', 'Harvard University') 
  INTO students (name, age, gender, college_name) 
    VALUES ('Jane Doe', 25, 'Female', 'Massachusetts Institute of Technology') 
  INTO students (name, age, gender, college_name) 
    VALUES ('Alice Smith', 21, 'Female', 'Stanford University') 
SELECT * FROM dual;

After inserting multiple rows using the INSERT ALL statement, we can query the table using the following SELECT statement:

SELECT * FROM students;

This will produce the following output:

NAME          AGE   GENDER   COLLEGE_NAME
-----------------------------------------
John Doe      23    Male     Harvard University
Jane Doe      25    Female   Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Alice Smith   21    Female   Stanford University

INSERT FIRST:

The “INSERT FIRST” syntax is used to insert a single row based on a condition. This feature is useful when we want to insert a row when a certain condition is met. The syntax of the “INSERT FIRST” statement is as follows:

INSERT FIRST
  WHEN condition1 THEN
      INTO table_name (column1, column2, …, columnN) 
        VALUES (value1, value2, …, valueN) 
  WHEN condition2 THEN
      INTO table_name (column1, column2, …, columnN) 
        VALUES (value1, value2, …, valueN) 
   
  ELSE
      INTO table_name (column1, column2, …, columnN) 
        VALUES (value1, value2, …, valueN)
SELECT * FROM dual;

The syntax of the INSERT FIRST statement is similar to the INSERT ALL statement. The difference is that the INSERT FIRST statement includes a conditional test using the WHEN condition THEN clause. If the condition specified in the WHEN clause is true, the subsequent INSERT INTO statement is executed.

Let’s take an example to demonstrate this. Suppose we have a table named “employees” with columns “employee_id,” “name,” “department,” and “salary.”

CREATE TABLE employees (
        employee_id NUMBER(5),
        name VARCHAR2(50),
        department VARCHAR2(50),
        salary NUMBER(8, 2)
);

Now, suppose we want to insert an employee's data into the table based on their salary. If the salary is greater than $50,000, insert into the “high_salary” table, else, insert into the “low_salary” table. We can use the following INSERT FIRST statement to achieve this:

INSERT FIRST 
  WHEN salary > 50000 THEN 
      INTO high_salary (employee_id, name, department, salary) 
        VALUES (111, 'John Doe', 'Finance', 75000) 
  WHEN salary <= 50000 THEN 
      INTO low_salary (employee_id, name, department, salary) 
        VALUES (222, 'Jane Doe', 'HR', 25000) 
SELECT * FROM employees;

The above code will insert a record for John Doe into the high_salary table since his salary ($75,000) is greater than $50,000. Similarly, Jane Doe's data will be inserted into the low_salary table, since her salary ($25,000) is less than or equal to $50,000.

Conclusion:

In Oracle SQL, we can insert multiple rows using the INSERT ALL statement and a single row using the INSERT FIRST statement. The INSERT FIRST statement is used when we want to insert values based on certain conditions. These statements will help you save time when inserting data into a table and allows for efficient database management.

INSERT ALL:

The INSERT ALL statement is a powerful tool for inserting multiple rows into a table. It allows for the insertion of multiple rows in a single statement. This is particularly useful when there is a large amount of data that needs to be inserted into a table. The INSERT ALL statement is used in the following way:

INSERT ALL
   INTO table_name (column1, column2, column3, ..., columnN) VALUES (value1, value2, value3, ..., valueN)
   INTO table_name (column1, column2, column3, ..., columnN) VALUES (value1, value2, value3, ..., valueN)
   .
   .
   .
   INTO table_name (column1, column2, column3, ..., columnN) VALUES (value1, value2, value3, ..., valueN)
SELECT 1 FROM DUAL;

In the above syntax, INTO clause is used to specify the columns of the table where the values will be inserted. VALUES clause is used to specify the values that will be inserted. Multiple INTO clauses can be used to insert multiple rows.

To perform a specific operation on each row, the INSERT ALL statement can also be used in combination with a condition. This means that an action will occur based on whether a defined condition is true or false. Here's an example:

INSERT ALL
   WHEN amount > 10000 THEN
     INTO orders_high (order_id, customer_id, amount) VALUES (order_id_seq.NEXTVAL, customer_id, amount)
   WHEN amount <= 10000 THEN
     INTO orders_low (order_id, customer_id, amount) VALUES (order_id_seq.NEXTVAL, customer_id, amount)
SELECT customer_id, amount FROM orders;

In this example, the INSERT ALL statement inserts rows into two different tables; "orders_low" and "orders_high", based on a condition. If the amount of a purchase is over 10,000, it will be inserted into the "orders_high" table. If it's under 10,000, it will go into the "orders_low" table.

INSERT FIRST:

The INSERT FIRST statement is used to insert rows into a table based on a condition, similarly to the INSERT ALL statement. However, unlike the INSERT ALL statement, the INSERT FIRST statement only inserts one row, and it is inserted into the first matching condition. Here's an example:

INSERT FIRST
   WHEN gender = 'male' THEN
     INTO employees_male (emp_id, name, gender, salary) VALUES (emp_id_seq.NEXTVAL, name, gender, salary)
   WHEN gender = 'female' THEN
     INTO employees_female (emp_id, name, gender, salary) VALUES (emp_id_seq.NEXTVAL, name, gender, salary)
SELECT name, gender, salary FROM employees;

In this example, the INSERT FIRST statement inserts a single row into either the "employees_male" or "employees_female" table, depending on the gender of the employee. If the gender is male, the row will be inserted into the "employees_male" table. If it's female, it will be inserted into the "employees_female" table.

Conclusion:

In Oracle SQL, the INSERT ALL and INSERT FIRST statements provide efficient ways to insert data into a table. The INSERT ALL statement is useful when you need to insert multiple rows, as it allows you to specify the columns and values for each row in a single statement. The INSERT FIRST statement is useful when you have a condition that determines where a single row should be inserted. By using these statements, you can improve the performance of your database, while also reducing the amount of code you need to write.

Popular questions

  1. What is the INSERT ALL statement in Oracle SQL?

The INSERT ALL statement allows you to insert multiple rows into a table at once. It is particularly useful when there is a large amount of data that needs to be inserted into a table. The syntax includes the INTO and VALUES clauses and can be used in combination with a condition.

  1. How can you use the INSERT ALL statement in Oracle SQL?

You can use INSERT ALL statement to insert multiple rows into a table. The syntax includes the INTO and VALUES clauses, which specify the columns and corresponding values respectively. You can also include a condition to perform a specific operation on each row.

  1. What is the INSERT FIRST statement in Oracle SQL?

The INSERT FIRST statement is used to insert a single row into a table based on a condition. Unlike the INSERT ALL statement, it only inserts one row, and it is inserted into the first matching condition. The syntax includes the WHEN clause and INTO and VALUES clauses.

  1. What is the advantage of using the INSERT ALL statement in Oracle SQL?

The primary advantage of using the INSERT ALL statement is that it allows you to insert multiple rows into a table in a single statement, which can significantly improve the performance of your database. This can be especially useful when dealing with large amounts of data.

  1. How can you use the INSERT FIRST statement in Oracle SQL?

You can use the INSERT FIRST statement to insert a single row into a table based on a specific condition. The syntax includes the WHEN clause, which specifies the condition, and the INTO and VALUES clauses, which specify the columns and corresponding values respectively. The row will be inserted into the first matching condition.

Tag

"SQL insertion"

My passion for coding started with my very first program in Java. The feeling of manipulating code to produce a desired output ignited a deep love for using software to solve practical problems. For me, software engineering is like solving a puzzle, and I am fully engaged in the process. As a Senior Software Engineer at PayPal, I am dedicated to soaking up as much knowledge and experience as possible in order to perfect my craft. I am constantly seeking to improve my skills and to stay up-to-date with the latest trends and technologies in the field. I have experience working with a diverse range of programming languages, including Ruby on Rails, Java, Python, Spark, Scala, Javascript, and Typescript. Despite my broad experience, I know there is always more to learn, more problems to solve, and more to build. I am eagerly looking forward to the next challenge and am committed to using my skills to create impactful solutions.

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