resize 2d vector c with code examples

Resizing a 2D vector in C++ is a common operation that allows programmers to adjust the size of their vectors dynamically during runtime. 2D vectors are essentially vectors of vectors, or a matrix in other words, and they are used extensively in mathematical operations and simulations.

In this article, we will explore how to resize a 2D vector in C++, along with code examples that demonstrate how to do so.

Initialization of a 2D Vector

Before we dive into resizing a 2D vector, let's first take a look at how to initialize a 2D vector in C++. There are multiple ways to initialize a 2D vector, but let's take a look at the two most common methods:

Method 1: Using the vector class's constructor

std::vector<std::vector> matrix(rows, std::vector(cols));

This initializes a 2D vector of integers, where "rows" specifies the number of rows you want to create and "cols" specifies the number of columns. The resulting 2D vector is initialized with all elements set to 0.

Method 2: Using nested vector declarations

std::vector<std::vector> matrix;

matrix.resize(rows);

for(int i = 0; i < rows; i++){

matrix[i].resize(cols);

}

This initializes a 2D vector of integers, where "rows" specifies the number of rows you want to create and "cols" specifies the number of columns. It uses the resize() method to create a vector of size "rows" and then initializes a vector of size "cols" for each row using the resize() method within a loop.

Now that we have initialized our 2D vector, let's move on to resizing it.

Resizing a 2D Vector

There are multiple techniques you can use to resize a 2D vector, such as using the resize() method or swapping with a resized vector. In this article, we will cover one of the most common approaches: using a loop to iterate through all the elements of the 2D vector and resizing each inner vector.

Here is an example of how to resize a 2D vector:

void resize_matrix(std::vector<std::vector>& matrix, int new_rows, int new_cols){

for (int i = 0; i < matrix.size(); i++){

matrix[i].resize(new_cols);

}

matrix.resize(new_rows, std::vector(new_cols));

}

Let's break down this code and explain how it works.

The function first uses a for loop to resize each inner vector, so that we only resize the columns and not the rows. It iterates through all the rows of the 2D vector and resizes the inner vector to have the new number of columns, as specified by the parameter "new_cols."

Following this, the function then uses the resize() method again to resize the entire 2D vector, this time resizing both the rows and the columns. The new number of rows is specified by the parameter "new_rows," and the function initializes each new row with a vector of the specified size "new_cols" using the vector class's constructor.

The newly created elements are initialized with the default value of int in this case.

Example 1:

Let's take an example to illustrate how to use this resizing function. Let's say we have a 2D vector of integers of size 3×3, and we want to resize it to 4×4. Here's how we would call the resize_matrix() function:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};

int new_rows = 4;

int new_cols = 4;

resize_matrix(matrix, new_rows, new_cols);

This resizes the 2D vector to 4×4, where the new elements are initialized with the default value of integer (0).

Example 2:

Let's take another example where we have a 2D vector of integers of size 2×3, and we want to resize it to 4×6. Here's how we would call the resize_matrix() function:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}};

int new_rows = 4;

int new_cols = 6;

resize_matrix(matrix, new_rows, new_cols);

This resizes the 2D vector to 4×6, where the new elements are initialized with the default value of integer (0).

Conclusion:

In this article, we explored how to resize a 2D vector in C++, along with code examples that demonstrated how to do so. The function we used could resize the 2D vector both in terms of rows and columns, and we used a loop to resize each inner vector of the 2D vector. Resizing a 2D vector can help programmers adjust the size of their vectors dynamically during runtime, making their programs more efficient and flexible.

here are some additional points to consider:

Initialization of a 2D Vector:

One thing to keep in mind while initializing a 2D vector is the data type. It's important to specify the datatype that you want, whether it's float, integer, double, or any other datatype.

An additional way to initialize a 2D vector is to use an initializer list, which is a convenient way to initialize large 2D vectors. Here's an example:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};

In this example, we are initializing a 2D vector of integers with three rows and three columns using an initializer list. Note that each vector within the matrix is enclosed within curly braces, and the entire matrix is enclosed in double curly braces.

Resizing a 2D Vector:

In addition to the method we discussed previously, an alternate method to resize a 2D vector is to use the assign() method.

Here's an example:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}};

int new_rows = 4;

int new_cols = 6;

matrix.assign(new_rows, std::vector(new_cols));

In this example, we are using the assign() method to resize the 2D vector. The method takes two arguments, the first being the number of new rows, and the second being a vector containing the new size of each column. In this case, we are resizing the vector to have four rows and six columns, and the elements are initialized with the default value of int.

Another important thing to keep in mind while resizing the 2D vector is to make sure that all of the inner vectors have the same size. If you try to access an element that doesn't exist in an inner vector, it results in an error.

Optimizing performance:

In terms of performance, it's better to avoid resizing a 2D vector frequently as it can be an expensive operation. Instead, consider initializing the 2D vector with the maximum size you might need and then fill only the necessary elements.

Additionally, you can use a single vector to represent the 2D vector, where the element at position (x,y) is represented by vector[x*cols + y]. This method is more memory-efficient and faster to resize. The disadvantage is the added complexity of accessing an element, as you must compute the index by hand.

Conclusion:

Overall, initializing and resizing a 2D vector in C++ is a critical operation for many applications. Careful consideration of the datatype and size, along with careful optimizations, can help make the code more efficient and easier to manage.

Popular questions

Sure, here are 5 questions along with their answers:

Q1. What is a 2D vector in C++?

A: A 2D vector in C++ is a vector of vectors, or a matrix in other words. It is an array of arrays of elements of the same type, arranged in a grid-like pattern of rows and columns.

Q2. How do you initialize a 2D vector in C++?

A: One method of initializing a 2D vector in C++ is to use the vector class's constructor. Here's an example:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix(rows, std::vector(cols));

This initializes a 2D vector of integers, where "rows" specifies the number of rows you want to create and "cols" specifies the number of columns.

Q3. What is the function of "resize_matrix()" in resizing a 2D vector?

A: The function "resize_matrix()" is used to resize a 2D vector in C++. It uses a loop to iterate through all the elements of the 2D vector and resizes each inner vector to the new number of columns. Following this, it uses the resize() method again to resize the entire 2D vector, this time resizing both the rows and the columns.

Q4. What is an initializer list, and how do you use it to initialize a 2D vector?

A: An initializer list is a convenient way to initialize large 2D vectors. Here's an example:

std::vector<std::vector> matrix = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};

In this example, we are initializing a 2D vector of integers with three rows and three columns using an initializer list. Note that each vector within the matrix is enclosed within curly braces, and the entire matrix is enclosed in double curly braces.

Q5. How can you optimize the performance of resizing a 2D vector in C++?

A: To optimize the performance of resizing a 2D vector in C++, it's better to avoid resizing a 2D vector frequently as it can be an expensive operation. Instead, consider initializing the 2D vector with the maximum size you might need and then fill only the necessary elements. Additionally, you can use a single vector to represent the 2D vector, where the element at position (x,y) is represented by vector[x*cols + y]. This method is more memory-efficient and faster to resize. The disadvantage is the added complexity of accessing an element, as you must compute the index by hand.

Tag

"vector-resizing"

As a senior DevOps Engineer, I possess extensive experience in cloud-native technologies. With my knowledge of the latest DevOps tools and technologies, I can assist your organization in growing and thriving. I am passionate about learning about modern technologies on a daily basis. My area of expertise includes, but is not limited to, Linux, Solaris, and Windows Servers, as well as Docker, K8s (AKS), Jenkins, Azure DevOps, AWS, Azure, Git, GitHub, Terraform, Ansible, Prometheus, Grafana, and Bash.

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