vue 3 router redirect with code examples 2

Vue Router is one of the most important parts of Vue.js. It allows developers to easily create dynamic and interactive web applications by enabling them to put their components into different routes. Vue 3, the latest version of this famous JavaScript framework, has introduced new features, enhancements, and functionality that makes it even easier to create and manage components.

One of the new features in Vue 3 is the ability to redirect to different routes. This feature is useful when you want to redirect a user to another page based on certain conditions, such as after login, logout or registration. In this article, we'll cover how to redirect in Vue 3 Router with code examples.

Getting Started with Vue 3 Router

Before we dive into redirecting with Vue 3, it's important to understand the basics of Vue 3 Router. If you're just starting, we recommend you take a look at our previous article about Vue Router to learn about the basics. Once you have that down, getting started with Vue 3 Router is easy. First, you'll need to install Vue 3 and Vue Router:

npm install vue@next vue-router@4

After installing these packages, create your Vue app and configure your router.

import { createApp } from 'vue'
import { createRouter, createWebHistory } from 'vue-router'
import Home from './components/Home.vue'
import About from './components/About.vue'

const routes = [
  {
    path: '/',
    name: 'home',
    component: Home
  },
  {
    path: '/about',
    name: 'about',
    component: About
  }
]

const router = createRouter({
  history: createWebHistory(),
  routes
})

const app = createApp({})
app.use(router)
app.mount('#app')

Now you have everything set up for Vue 3 Router. With that, let's dive into the various ways to redirect with Vue 3 Router.

Redirecting after Login

One of the common use cases of redirecting is after successful login. For this example, let's assume that you have a login page component that handles authentication.

import { ref } from 'vue'
import { useRouter } from 'vue-router'

export default {
  setup() {
    const router = useRouter()
    const email = ref('')
    const password = ref('')
    const error = ref('')

    const login = () => {
      // Implement your login logic here
      if (email.value === '' || password.value === '') {
        error.value = 'Please enter valid credentials'
      } else {
        // Redirect to the home page after login
        router.push('/')
      }
    }
    return { email, password, error, login }
  }
}

In this example, we are using the useRoute composition function from Vue Router to get access to the router inside the component. We are then using the router.push method to navigate to the homepage after successful login. This redirects the user to the Homepage.

Redirecting on 404 Error

Another use case for redirection is when a user visits a URL that doesn't exist. You can use a catch-all route to handle all the invalid routes. For example, let's add a catch-all route that redirects the user to the 404 page.

const routes = [
  {
    path: '/',
    name: 'home',
    component: Home
  },
  {
    path: '/about',
    name: 'about',
    component: About
  },
  {
    path: '/:catchAll(.*)',
    name: 'notFound',
    component: NotFound
  }
]

In the above example, we are using the :catchAll parameter to match any route that doesn't exist. The NotFound component will then be displayed on the redirected route.

Redirecting with Authentication guard

Another common use case for redirection is Vue Router navigation guards. Navigation guards allow Vue Router to hook into the navigation process and guard access to certain routes. The beforeEach guard will be called before each route change. This guard allows you to implement logic before navigating to a route.

const routes = [
  {
    path: '/',
    name: 'home',
    component: Home
  },
  {
    path: '/about',
    name: 'about',
    component: About,
    meta: { requiresAuth: true }
  }
]

router.beforeEach((to, from, next) => {
  if (to.matched.some(record => record.meta.requiresAuth)) {
    // Check whether the user is authenticated or not,
    // if not, redirect to the login page.
    if (!loggedIn) {
      next('/login')
    } else {
      next()
    }
  } else {
    next()
  }
})

In the above example, we are checking whether the current route requires authentication by checking requiresAuth meta field. If the user is authenticated, they will be redirected to the route they were originally headed to, otherwise, they will be redirected to a login page.

Conclusion

That's it! We've covered three different ways to redirect using Vue 3 Router. These examples should help you get started with more complex routing patterns and compositions with Vue Router. The ability to redirect in Vue 3 Router comes in handy in various situations, including after successfully logging in, invalid URLs, or authenticated routes.

Vue.js 3 continues to be a powerful and dynamic framework for building modern single-page applications. With Vue Router and the new features in Vue.js 3, developers have even more tools to create dynamic and interactive applications. So, get started today and try out the new redirect feature in Vue 3 Router!

let's dive a bit deeper into some of the previous topics that we covered in this article.

Vue 3 Router Basics

Vue Router is a package used by Vue.js to create single-page applications. It allows developers to load different pages or components based on the user's actions or browser URL. When using Vue Router, the URL changes as the user navigates through the app, ensuring a seamless user experience and making it possible to use the browser's back and forward buttons.

Vue Router has two parts: the router object and router-view component. The router object is responsible for setting up routes, including defining different paths and components. The router-view component is used to display the appropriate component based on the current route.

To get started with Vue Router, you'll need to install it via NPM or yarn:

npm install vue-router@4

After installation, you'll need to import the package and create a new router instance:

import { createRouter, createWebHistory } from 'vue-router'

const router = createRouter({
  history: createWebHistory(),
  routes: []
})

This creates a new router instance with an empty array of routes. You can then add routes using the routes array. Each route is an object with a path property and a component to display when the route is matched.

const router = createRouter({
  history: createWebHistory(),
  routes: [
    {
      path: '/',
      name: 'home',
      component: Home
    },
    {
      path: '/about',
      name: 'about',
      component: About
    }
  ]
})

After setting up the router instance, you can add it to your Vue app using the use method.

const app = createApp({})
app.use(router)
app.mount('#app')

Now you have everything set up for Vue 3 Router.

Redirecting in Vue 3 Router

Redirecting in Vue 3 Router is accomplished using the router.push method. This method takes a string or a Location object to navigate to a particular URL. You can use this method to redirect users to a different page, component, or route after certain events such as login or logout.

const login = () => {
  // Validation and authentication logic
  router.push('/dashboard')
}

const logout = () => {
  // Logout logic
  router.push('/login')
}

In the above example, we're using router.push('/dashboard') to redirect the user to the dashboard after successfully logging in. Similarly, we're using router.push('/login') to redirect the user to the login page after logging out.

In addition, you can also use navigation guards to control access to certain routes and redirect users based on their access level or authentication status. Navigation guards allow you to implement logic before navigating to a route.

router.beforeEach((to, from, next) => {
  // Check if user is authenticated
  if (!authenticated && to.name !== 'Login') {
    next({ name: 'Login' })
  } else {
    next()
  }
})

In the above example, we're using the beforeEach guard to check if the user is authenticated. If the user is not authenticated and is not on the login page, they are redirected to the login page.

Conclusion

Vue 3 Router is an essential tool for building dynamic, single-page applications with Vue.js. Redirecting in Vue 3 Router allows developers to redirect users to different views or pages based on certain events or conditions. With Vue.js 3 and Vue Router, it's easier than ever to build SPA routes that are flexible and easy to manage.

Popular questions

  1. What is Vue Router?
    Answer: Vue Router is a package used by Vue.js to create single-page applications. It enables developers to load different pages or components based on the user's actions or browser URL.

  2. How can you redirect in Vue 3 Router?
    Answer: You can redirect in Vue 3 Router by using the router.push method, which takes a string or a Location object to navigate to a particular URL.

  3. Can you redirect based on certain conditions in Vue 3 Router?
    Answer: Yes, you can redirect based on certain conditions in Vue 3 Router such as after login, logout or registration. You can use the router.push method to redirect the user to a specific page/component or route after those events.

  4. What is a navigation guard in Vue 3 Router?
    Answer: A navigation guard in Vue 3 Router allows developers to implement logic before navigating to a route. It is used to control access to certain routes and redirect users based on their access level or authentication status.

  5. How do you get started with Vue 3 Router?
    Answer: To get started with Vue 3 Router, you need to install it via NPM or yarn, create a new router instance, add routes using the routes array and add the router instance to your Vue app using the use method.

Tag

Rerouting.

My passion for coding started with my very first program in Java. The feeling of manipulating code to produce a desired output ignited a deep love for using software to solve practical problems. For me, software engineering is like solving a puzzle, and I am fully engaged in the process. As a Senior Software Engineer at PayPal, I am dedicated to soaking up as much knowledge and experience as possible in order to perfect my craft. I am constantly seeking to improve my skills and to stay up-to-date with the latest trends and technologies in the field. I have experience working with a diverse range of programming languages, including Ruby on Rails, Java, Python, Spark, Scala, Javascript, and Typescript. Despite my broad experience, I know there is always more to learn, more problems to solve, and more to build. I am eagerly looking forward to the next challenge and am committed to using my skills to create impactful solutions.

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