vue js tutorial with code examples 2

Vue.js is a popular JavaScript framework for building user interfaces. Released in 2014, it has quickly gained popularity among developers due to its ease of use and flexibility. In the previous article, we covered some basic concepts and code examples to get started with Vue.js. In this tutorial, we will dive deeper into Vue.js by discussing more advanced concepts and code examples.

Vue.js Components

In Vue.js, components are reusable pieces of code that can be used to build complex user interfaces. Components can be thought of as building blocks for your application. A component can contain other components, making it easy to separate your application into smaller, more manageable pieces. This promotes code reusability, modularity, and reduces code duplication.

Creating Components

Creating a component in Vue.js is straightforward and involves creating a new Vue instance. Here is an example:

Vue.component('my-component', {
template: '

My Component

'
});

In the example code above, we have created a new Vue component named "my-component". The template property defines the HTML used to render the component.

Using Components

To use a component in your application, you can include it in another Vue instance or another component. Here is an example:

new Vue({
el: '#app'
});

In the code above, we have included the "my-component" component in a new Vue instance, making it available for use in our application.

Passing Data to Components

Components can receive data from their parent components or from the Vue instance. To pass data to a component, you can use the props property, which defines a list of properties that can be passed to the component. Here is an example:

Vue.component('my-component', {
props: ['message'],
template: '

{{ message }}

'
});

new Vue({
el: '#app',
data: {
message: 'Hello from the parent component!'
}
});

In the code above, we have created a new Vue component named "my-component" which receives a "message" prop. The prop is then rendered in the component template using the double mustache syntax. To pass the "message" prop to the component, we included it in the data object of the parent Vue instance.

Computed Properties

Computed properties are an essential feature in Vue.js that allows you to define properties that depend on other properties. Computed properties are cached, and they only re-evaluate when their dependencies change. This feature is particularly useful when you need to perform complex or resource-intensive calculations based on the component's data.

Here is an example:

Vue.component('my-component', {
props: ['price'],
computed: {
totalPrice: function() {
return this.price * 1.10;
}
},
template: '

Total price is: {{ totalPrice }}

'
});

new Vue({
el: '#app',
data: {
price: 10
}
});

In the example above, we have defined a new computed property named "totalPrice" that depends on the "price" prop. The computed property multiplies the "price" by 1.10 to calculate the total price, which is then rendered in the template.

Conditions and Loops

Vue.js provides several directives that allow you to conditionally render content or repeat content based on a data source. These directives are v-if, v-else-if, v-else, v-for, and v-show. Here is an example of using v-if and v-for:

Vue.component('my-component', {
props: ['items'],
template: <ul> <li v-for="item in items" v-if="item.active">{{ item.name }}</li> </ul>
});

new Vue({
el: '#app',
data: {
items: [
{ name: 'Item 1', active: true },
{ name: 'Item 2', active: false },
{ name: 'Item 3', active: true },
]
}
});

In the code above, we have defined a new Vue component that takes an array of items as a prop. We are using the v-for directive to iterate over the items array and render each item as a list item. We are also using the v-if directive to conditionally render items based on their "active" property.

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we have covered some advanced concepts in Vue.js like components, computed properties, and conditionals and loops. Vue.js provides an excellent ecosystem for building complex user interfaces that are efficient, scalable, and maintainable. We hope this tutorial has provided you with valuable insights into Vue.js, and you are now equipped to start building your own applications with Vue.js.

here is more information about previous topics covered in this tutorial.

Components

Vue.js components are reusable and self-contained pieces of code that can be used to build user interfaces. Components can contain other components, making it easy to create complex UIs. Components can be created using the Vue.component() method, which takes a name and options object as arguments. The options object can include properties like template, props, computed, methods, and lifecycle hooks.

  • template: defines the HTML template used to render the component.
  • props: defines an array of properties that can be passed to the component from its parent.
  • computed: defines computed properties, which depend on other properties and are cached.
  • methods: defines a list of methods that can be called by the component.
  • lifecycle hooks: defines methods that are called during component initialization and lifecycle events like created, mounted, updated, and destroyed.

Using Components

To use a component, you must include it in another component or a Vue instance. The component can be included in the template using the component's name, for example:

<my-component></my-component>

When the component is included in a template, Vue.js creates a new instance of the component for each occurrence of the tag in the template.

Passing Data to Components

Components can receive data from their parent component or the parent Vue instance. To pass data to a component, you can use props, which are defined in the component's option object. Props are used to pass data from the parent component to the child component. The child component can access these props using the this.props syntax.

Vue.component('my-component', {
  props: ['message'],
  template: '<div>{{ message }}</div>'
});

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  data: {
    message: 'Hello from the parent component!'
  }
});

In the example above, the parent Vue instance passes a message prop to the child component. The child component receives the prop using the this.message syntax.

Computed Properties

Computed properties are properties that are calculated based on other properties. They are declared in the computed property inside a component's option object. Computed properties are cached and only re-evaluated if their dependencies change.

Vue.component('my-component', {
  props: ['price'],
  computed: {
    totalPrice: function() {
      return this.price * 1.10;
    }
  },
  template: '<div>Total price is: {{ totalPrice }}</div>'
});

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  data: {
    price: 10
  }
});

In the example above, the child component calculates the total price based on the price prop passed from the parent instance. The total price is calculated based on a multiplier of 1.10, and the computed property is cached and only recalculated when the price prop changes.

Conditions and Loops

Vue.js provides several directives for operating with conditions and loops.

The v-if directive is used to conditionally render content based on a condition:

<h1 v-if="showTitle">Title</h1>

The v-else-if directive is used to render content when multiple conditions are present:

<span v-else-if="isLoading">Loading...</span>
<span v-else>Error</span>

The v-for directive is used to render a list of items based on an array or object. It can iterate over arrays, objects, or ranges.

<ul>
  <li v-for="item in items">{{ item }}</li>
</ul>

<ul>
  <li v-for="(value, key) in object">{{ key }}: {{ value }}</li>
</ul>

<div v-for="n in 10">{{ n }}</div>

The v-show directive is used to conditionally render content by toggling its display property based on the condition.

<div v-show="isVisible">Visible</div>

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we have covered some advanced concepts of Vue.js like components, computed properties, and conditions and loops. Understanding these concepts is vital to developing complex, scalable, and maintainable applications. Vue.js offers a lot of flexibility in building complex user interfaces. By following the best practices and guidelines outlined in this tutorial, you can easily implement Vue.js in your own projects.

Popular questions

Sure, here are five questions and their answers related to this tutorial:

  1. What are Vue.js components?
  • Vue.js components are reusable and self-contained pieces of code that can be used to build user interfaces. Components can contain other components, making it easy to create complex UIs.
  1. How do you pass data to a Vue.js component?
  • Data can be passed to a Vue.js component using props, which are defined in the component's option object. Props are used to pass data from the parent component to the child component.
  1. What are computed properties in Vue.js?
  • Computed properties are properties that are calculated based on other properties. They are declared in the computed property inside a component's option object. Computed properties are cached and only re-evaluated if their dependencies change.
  1. How do you conditionally render content in Vue.js?
  • Vue.js provides several directives for operating with conditions and loops like v-if, v-else-if, and v-else. The v-if directive is used to conditionally render content based on a condition.
  1. What is the use of v-for directive in Vue.js?
  • The v-for directive is used to render a list of items based on an array or object. It can iterate over arrays, objects, or ranges in Vue.js.

Tag

VueTuts2

As a developer, I have experience in full-stack web application development, and I'm passionate about utilizing innovative design strategies and cutting-edge technologies to develop distributed web applications and services. My areas of interest extend to IoT, Blockchain, Cloud, and Virtualization technologies, and I have a proficiency in building efficient Cloud Native Big Data applications. Throughout my academic projects and industry experiences, I have worked with various programming languages such as Go, Python, Ruby, and Elixir/Erlang. My diverse skillset allows me to approach problems from different angles and implement effective solutions. Above all, I value the opportunity to learn and grow in a dynamic environment. I believe that the eagerness to learn is crucial in developing oneself, and I strive to work with the best in order to bring out the best in myself.
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